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There are various estimations about the number of the people concentrated on the streets and squares of the country. Athens had anything over 500,000 people on the streets, it is not easy to estimate it, but before the attack of the police every street leading to Syntagma and the square were packed, with thousands more coming from the neighbourhoods on foot or by buses and trains. Half an hour before the demo one could see the metro stations and the bus stops full of people waiting to get on a vehicle that would bring them to the centre.
Almost every city saw rallies and mass marches, with Heraklion of Crete, a city that holds a record in the recent wave of suicides, having a 30,000-strong march. Demonstrations all around the country turned violent, with people destroying banks or occupying governmental buildings, e.g. in Volos the branch of Eurobank and the town hall were torched (the latter probably by parastatal thugs), or on Corfu people attacked to the offices of their region’s MPs, trashing them, the town hall of Rhodes was occupied during the demo and still is occupied, to mention but a few of such actions.
In Athens police did several preemptive arrests in the morning hours before the start of the demonstration. Several activists were attacked by police officers in plain clothes and were detained as soon as they came out of their houses, while it was obvious since very early that police wanted to keep people away from the parliament. In there, the new austerity package (an over 600-page document that was given to the MPs 24 hours in advance with the advice to vote for it before Monday morning when the stock markets will open) was being ‘discussed’.
Early afternoon, when the occupiers of Law School tried to march from the occupied building to Syntagma, the police attacked to them breaking the block, while they attempted to raid the Law School several times during the night, using also rubber bullets.
Well before the arrival of most demonstrators who were still on their way, the police attacked en masse the crowd in Syntagma square using physical violence, chemical gases and shock grenades. After the attack a big part of the demonstration was concentrated on Amalias, Fillelinon, Ermou, Mitropoleos and Karageorgi Servias streets. People battled with police for over 5 hours in their effort to return to Syntagma. Other people erected big barricades across Korai square on both Stadiou and Panepistimiou streets and fought trying to reach Syntagma or defend themselves from police attacks. On Panepistimiou street police concentrated much of its forces on the barricade in front of Athens University and people clashed head to head defending their barricade in Propylaea.
DELTA and other motorcycle police units raided several times the crowd, especially in Mitropoleos street; MAT riot police did the same several times, but also things went the other way around. Besides the barricades and the substantial groupings of people, demonstrators broke in various smaller groups that clashed with small groups of cops or walked around searching for a barricade or to join a larger group.
After midnight the majority of the parliamentarians (199) voted for the new austerity memorandum that (among other measures) includes the drop of salaries by 22% and drops the minimum salary at about 400 euros per month, while unemployment rate has been doubled (over 20% in November 2011) within 16 months.
Throughout the day, 77 demonstrators were arrested and over 50 people injured by the police were hospitalized. The arrestees from Friday 10/2 have all been released on bail (more info as it comes).
Several banks, governmental buildings and two police departments (Acropolis and Exarchia depts.) were attacked by demonstrators during the night, while Athens city hall was occupied, but police concentrated forces invaded the building and arrested the occupiers. Looting and property destructions made part of the rage. Over 40 buildings were burnt in Athens, while occupations of public buildings still are holding all around Greece. The Law School occupation issued a statement calling everyone on the streets to continue the struggle; nevertheless, the occupation did end in the early hours of February 13th.
http://en.contrainfo.espiv.net/2012/02/12/greece-a-brief-summary-of-protest-mobilizations-on-february-12th-2012/

There are various estimations about the number of the people concentrated on the streets and squares of the country. Athens had anything over 500,000 people on the streets, it is not easy to estimate it, but before the attack of the police every street leading to Syntagma and the square were packed, with thousands more coming from the neighbourhoods on foot or by buses and trains. Half an hour before the demo one could see the metro stations and the bus stops full of people waiting to get on a vehicle that would bring them to the centre.

Almost every city saw rallies and mass marches, with Heraklion of Crete, a city that holds a record in the recent wave of suicides, having a 30,000-strong march. Demonstrations all around the country turned violent, with people destroying banks or occupying governmental buildings, e.g. in Volos the branch of Eurobank and the town hall were torched (the latter probably by parastatal thugs), or on Corfu people attacked to the offices of their region’s MPs, trashing them, the town hall of Rhodes was occupied during the demo and still is occupied, to mention but a few of such actions.

In Athens police did several preemptive arrests in the morning hours before the start of the demonstration. Several activists were attacked by police officers in plain clothes and were detained as soon as they came out of their houses, while it was obvious since very early that police wanted to keep people away from the parliament. In there, the new austerity package (an over 600-page document that was given to the MPs 24 hours in advance with the advice to vote for it before Monday morning when the stock markets will open) was being ‘discussed’.

Early afternoon, when the occupiers of Law School tried to march from the occupied building to Syntagma, the police attacked to them breaking the block, while they attempted to raid the Law School several times during the night, using also rubber bullets.

Well before the arrival of most demonstrators who were still on their way, the police attacked en masse the crowd in Syntagma square using physical violence, chemical gases and shock grenades. After the attack a big part of the demonstration was concentrated on Amalias, Fillelinon, Ermou, Mitropoleos and Karageorgi Servias streets. People battled with police for over 5 hours in their effort to return to Syntagma. Other people erected big barricades across Korai square on both Stadiou and Panepistimiou streets and fought trying to reach Syntagma or defend themselves from police attacks. On Panepistimiou street police concentrated much of its forces on the barricade in front of Athens University and people clashed head to head defending their barricade in Propylaea.

DELTA and other motorcycle police units raided several times the crowd, especially in Mitropoleos street; MAT riot police did the same several times, but also things went the other way around. Besides the barricades and the substantial groupings of people, demonstrators broke in various smaller groups that clashed with small groups of cops or walked around searching for a barricade or to join a larger group.

After midnight the majority of the parliamentarians (199) voted for the new austerity memorandum that (among other measures) includes the drop of salaries by 22% and drops the minimum salary at about 400 euros per month, while unemployment rate has been doubled (over 20% in November 2011) within 16 months.

Throughout the day, 77 demonstrators were arrested and over 50 people injured by the police were hospitalized. The arrestees from Friday 10/2 have all been released on bail (more info as it comes).

Several banks, governmental buildings and two police departments (Acropolis and Exarchia depts.) were attacked by demonstrators during the night, while Athens city hall was occupied, but police concentrated forces invaded the building and arrested the occupiers. Looting and property destructions made part of the rage. Over 40 buildings were burnt in Athens, while occupations of public buildings still are holding all around Greece. The Law School occupation issued a statement calling everyone on the streets to continue the struggle; nevertheless, the occupation did end in the early hours of February 13th.

http://en.contrainfo.espiv.net/2012/02/12/greece-a-brief-summary-of-protest-mobilizations-on-february-12th-2012/

Syrian children’s song 

AR EN FR language


Greece Rιοts  People fights aginst Austerity plans

Athens syntagma square 12 feb 2012

image

This is the climax to the 1940 Charlie Chaplin film “The Great Dictator”. While not completely applicable to anything today, I still find it very moving.

Interestingly enough, I notice that whoever is president, commenters tell me this speech does apply today! Use it against Bush, use it against Obama. Clearly this IS a universal message.

Speech of the Great Dictator by Sir Charles Chaplin

I’m sorry, but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone if possible- Jew, Gentile, black men, white…

We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each others’ happiness, not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge has made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind.

We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery ,we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all.

Even now my voice is reaching millionsthroughout the world, millions of despairing men, women, and little children, victims of a system that makes men torture and imprison innocent people.

To those who can hear me, I say “Do not despair.”

The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed, the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish.

Soldiers! Don’t give yourselves to brutes, men who despise you and enslave you; who regiment your lives, tell you what to do, what to think and what to feel! Who drill you, diet you, treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder!

Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men—machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have a love of humanity in your hearts! You don’t hate!

Only the unloved hate; the unloved and the unnatural.

Soldiers! Don’t fight for slavery! Fight for liberty!

In the seventeenth chapter of St. Luke, it’s written “the kingdom of God is within man”, not one man nor a group of men, but in all men! In you! You, the people, have the power, the power to create machines, the power to create happiness! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure. Then in the name of democracy, let us use that power.

Let us all unite.

Let us fight for a new world, a decent world that will give men a chance to work, that will give youth a future and old age a security. By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie! They do not fulfill their promise. They never will!

Dictators free themselves but they enslave the people!

Now let us fight to fulfill that promise! Let us fight to free the world! To do away with national barriers! To do away with greed, with hate and intolerance!

Let us fight for a world of reason, a world where science and progress will lead to all men’s happiness.

Soldiers, in the name of democracy, let us all unite!

Protesters are seen through tear gas during clashes in central Athens, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012. Riots engulfed central Athens and buildings went up in flames in mass protests late Sunday as lawmakers prepared for a historic parliamentary vote on harsh austerity measures demanded to keep the country solvent and within the eurozone. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

Protesters are seen through tear gas during clashes in central Athens, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012. Riots engulfed central Athens and buildings went up in flames in mass protests late Sunday as lawmakers prepared for a historic parliamentary vote on harsh austerity measures demanded to keep the country solvent and within the eurozone. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

V for Vendetta  

The futuristic tale unfolds in a Great Britain that’s a fascist state. A freedom fighter known as V uses terrorist tactics to fight the oppressive society. He rescues a young woman from the secret police, and she becomes his unlikely ally. Written by Siriuslydead

Tells the story of Evey Hammond and her unlikely but instrumental part in bringing down the fascist government that has taken control of a futuristic Great Britain. Saved from a life-and-death situation by a man in a Guy Fawkes mask who calls himself V, she learns a general summary of V’s past and, after a time, decides to help him bring down those who committed the atrocities that led to Britain being in the shape that it is in. Written by ameelmore

Set against the futuristic landscape of totalitarian Britain, V For Vendetta tells the story of a mild-mannered young woman named Evey who is rescued from a life-and-death situation by a masked vigilante known only as “V.” Incomparably charismatic and ferociously skilled in the art of combat and deception, V ignites a revolution when he detonates two London landmarks and takes over the government-controlled airwaves, urging his fellow citizens to rise up against tyranny and oppression. As Evey uncovers the truth about V’s mysterious background, she also discovers the truth about herself - and emerges as his unlikely ally in the culmination of his plot to bring freedom and justice back to a society fraught with cruelty and corruption. Written by Alex W

In the not too distant future, Britain is filled with torture cells, unfair punishments, prejudice against minorities. However in the mist of all this chaos, one man known only by the name V dares to stand up to the government and is labeled as a terrorist. One night V rescues a mild young woman called Evey Hammond and an unlikely bond between the two emerges which results with Evey becoming Vs ally. But though V may be charismatic and have a passion for justice he also is bitter and has his own personal hatred of the government for something they did to him long ago. As November the 5th, the day V says he and those who will follow him will stand up to the government once and for all approaches, Detective Finch becomes more and more determined to uncover the truth about V, however his search leads him to ask to question whether or not he is on the right side. Written by x_babyangel

In this obscure and Gothic tale, one attractive girl, Evey gets involved accidentally in a terrorist attack, perpetrated by a masked and megalomaniac character, V. V is following the same steps of Guy Fawkes, a sort of terrorist of the XVII century, who wanted to blow up the English Parlament in London. However, in the present time, the Orwellian London lives under the fascist government of chancellor Adam, and V will fight against his regime, using the power of powder, blowing up important buildings. Evey will be chased by the secret police, thinking that she’s the accomplice of V, who will accomplish Fawkes’ mission of destroying the Parlament on the 5th of November, in this mixture of The Phantom of the Opera, George Orwell’s 1984 and Batman. Written by Alejandro Frias